Giant Food

Giant Food is headquartered in Landover, Md. and operates 164 supermarkets in Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, and the District of Columbia with approximately 20,000 associates. Included within the 164 stores are 155 full-service pharmacies, 82 full-service PNC Banks, and 24 Starbucks locations. With flexible options and convenient solutions, Giant fits all the ways today’s busy consumers want to shop – whether in-store, via Giant Pickup or home delivery from Giant, Delivers which combined serves 157 store locations. For more information on Giant, visit giantfood.com.

Number of Wild Fisheries Sources
Number of Fisheries Certified or in a FIP
Number of Fisheries Assessed as Low Risk by Nonprofit Science Partner
Number of Countries Where Farmed Seafood is Sourced
% of Farmed Seafood Sources Certified

Number of Wild Fisheries Sources

38

Number of Fisheries Certified or in a FIP

25

Number of Fisheries Assessed as Low Risk by Nonprofit Science Partner

13

Number of Countries Where Farmed Seafood is Sourced

12

% of Farmed Seafood Sources Certified

98%

Production Methods Used
    • Midwater trawl
    • Bottom trawl
    • Dredge
    • Purse seine
    • Gillnets and entangling nets
    • Hook and line
    • Longlines
    • Handlines and pole-lines
    • Rake / hand gathered / hand netted
    • Pots and traps
    • Farmed
Summary

This profile covers all own-brand fresh, frozen and canned wild caught and farmed seafood sold by Giant Food in 2021. We are committed to sourcing only seafood from fisheries and farms that are well managed to ensure that fish populations remain healthy and that fishing and farming methods have minimal environmental and social impact. All seafood we sell, whether it’s fresh, frozen, or canned, must meet important sustainability criteria. We work with the Gulf of Maine Research Institute (GMRI), a nonprofit third party, to help us maintain the credibility and transparency of our policy. For both wild-caught and farmed seafood, we will source a product if it has a certification benchmarked by the Global Sustainable Seafood Initiative (GSSI), or if it is from an active fishery or aquaculture improvement project. In cases where neither exists, we will only source a product if it assessed as low risk by GMRI. Low risk sources are managed by competent authorities and have management plans in place that incorporate a science-based approach to ensure sustainability. We work closely with our suppliers to make sure we know where the seafood we sell comes from, and we require traceability to the source fishery or farm for every item we carry.

Giant Food also requires canned tuna suppliers to comply with the International Sustainable Seafood Foundation conservation measures, and encourages shrimp suppliers to buy from Seafood Task Force members when sourcing from Thailand. Giant Food’s parent company, Ahold Delhaize, is a member of the Seafood Task Force, as well as the Global Dialogue on Seafood Traceability. Ahold Delhaize is also a signatory to the World Economic Forum Tuna Declaration. Through the Tuna Declaration, we are committed to pursuing traceability to the vessel for all fresh, frozen, and canned tuna from every country.

For more information on our seafood sourcing policy, please visit:

Associated Fisheries

Species and Location
Production Methods
Certification or Improvement Project
Sustainability Ratings
Notes

Species and Location

fishery flag

Acadian redfish

Sebastes fasciatus

Gulf of Maine and Georges Bank

Fishery countries:
United States

Production Methods

  • Bottom trawl

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

Well managed

Environmental Notes
  • This fishery is unlikely to have unacceptable impacts on ETP species. ETP species that may interact with the fishery include marine mammals, sea turtles and Atlantic sturgeon, but recorded interactions are low.
  • This fishery does not pose a risk of serious harm to bycatch species. Major bycatch species include dogfish and skate, of which, thorny skate is overfished. There is a partial strategy in place to ensure the fishery does not hinder the recovery of thorny skate.
  • Bottom trawls will directly impact on the sea bed. However, management measures are in place.
General Notes

Reference

SAI Global, 2016, MSC Assessment Final Report and Determination for US Acadian Redfish, Pollock and Haddock Otter Trawl Fishery.

Species and Location

fishery flag

Alaska pollock

Theragra chalcogramma

Aleutian Islands

Fishery countries:
United States

Production Methods

  • Midwater trawl

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

Well managed

Environmental Notes
  • This fishery is unlikely to impact ETP species.
  • Bycatch for this fishery is considered low.
  • This fishery is unlikely to have a significant impact on the sea bed, but occasional impacts may occur.
General Notes
  • This fish plays an important role in the marine food web and so potential impacts on the wider marine ecosystem must be monitored.

Species and Location

fishery flag

American angler

Lophius americanus

US North Atlantic South

Fishery countries:
United States

Production Methods

  • Bottom trawl

Certification or Improvement Project

Not certified or in a FIP

Sustainability Ratings

Well managed

Environmental Notes
  • Bycatch includes at-risk Atlantic cod and flounders and long-finned pilot whales. Work to minimize bycatch is ongoing.
  • Bottom trawls will impact the seafloor habitat.
General Notes

References

Seafood Watch, Goosefish, United States, Northwest Atlantic Ocean, Bottom trawls

Species and Location

fishery flag

American lobster

Homarus americanus

Gulf of Maine and Georges Bank

Fishery countries:
United States

Production Methods

  • Pots and traps

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

Well managed

Environmental Notes
  • There are potential risks to ETP species with this fishery, but mitigation actions are underway.
  • Bycatch for this fishery is considered low.
  • This fishery is unlikely to have a significant impact on the sea bed.
General Notes
  • No additional notes.

Species and Location

fishery flag

American lobster

Homarus americanus

Gulf of St. Lawrence South

Fishery countries:
Canada

Production Methods

  • Pots and traps

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

Well managed

Environmental Notes
  • This fishery is unlikely to impact ETP species. The risk to marine mammals of entanglement in lobster gear is considered low.
  • Bycatch for this fishery is considered low.
  • This fishery is unlikely to have a significant impact on the sea bed.
General Notes
  • No additional notes

Species and Location

fishery flag

American plaice

Hippoglossoides platessoides

Gulf of Maine and Georges Bank

Fishery countries:
United States

Production Methods

  • Bottom trawl

Certification or Improvement Project

Not certified or in a FIP

Sustainability Ratings

Sustainability not rated

Environmental Notes
  • Profile not yet complete.
General Notes
  • This fishery is assessed as low risk by our nonprofit science partner, Gulf of Maine Research Institute.

Species and Location

fishery flag

American sea scallop

Placopecten magellanicus

US Atlantic - Mid-Atlantic Bight

Fishery countries:
United States

Production Methods

  • Dredge

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

Well managed

Environmental Notes
  • There are risks to sea turtles with this fishery, but there are mitigation measures in place.
  • Bycatch is a risk in this fishery.
  • Dredges will directly impact on the sea bed.
General Notes
  • No additional notes.

Species and Location

fishery flag

Atlantic cod

Gadus morhua

Icelandic

Fishery countries:
Iceland

Production Methods

  • Longlines

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

Well managed

Environmental Notes
  • This fishery is unlikely to have direct impacts on ETP species.
  • There is bycatch for this fishery but non-target species are retained. Management measures are in place to reduce impacts on retained species.
  • This fishery is unlikely to have a significant impact on the sea bed.
General Notes
  • No additional notes.

Species and Location

fishery flag

Atlantic croaker

Micropogonias undulatus

N&S American Atlantic Coast

Fishery countries:
United States

Production Methods

  • Gillnets and entangling nets

Certification or Improvement Project

Not certified or in a FIP

Sustainability Ratings

Sustainability not rated

Environmental Notes
  • Profile not yet complete.
General Notes
  • This fishery is assessed as low risk by our nonprofit science partner, Gulf of Maine Research Institute.

Species and Location

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Atlantic herring

Clupea harengus

Nova Scotia and Bay of Fundy

Fishery countries:
Canada

Production Methods

  • Midwater trawl

Certification or Improvement Project

Not certified or in a FIP

Sustainability Ratings

Needs improvement

Environmental Notes
  • Profile not yet complete.
General Notes
  • This fishery is assessed as low risk by our nonprofit science partner, Gulf of Maine Research Institute.

Species and Location

fishery flag

Atlantic salmon

Salmo salar

Canada

Fishery countries:
Canada

Production Methods

  • Farmed

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

Managed

Environmental Notes
  • Salmon rely on wild capture fisheries for feed. Marine ingredients (herring, menhaden, anchovy) are sourced from fisheries that currently have no serious conservation concerns.
  • There is an ongoing risk of impact that fish escaping from Canadian-sited farms may have on their wild counterparts (as evidenced by the higher numbers of escapees in Canadian rivers).
  • The use of antibiotics was markedly high. The limited availability of registered pesticide therapeutants for the control of sea lice has resulted, at least twice, in the development of resistance to the few products permitted. There is potential for larger-scale, cumulative ecological impacts from effluents.
General Notes

References

Seafood Watch, Atlantic Salmon, Farmed, Canada

Species and Location

fishery flag

Atlantic salmon

Salmo salar

Chile

Fishery countries:
Chile

Production Methods

  • Farmed

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

Managed

Environmental Notes
  • Salmon rely on wild capture fisheries for feed. At least 50% of the feed used in certified production is required to be responsibly or sustainably sourced.
  • There are concerns about the impact of farmed salmon escapes and disease outbreaks on wild salmonids. Overall, the Chilean industry continues to struggle with the control of bacterial diseases and sea lice parasites as indicated by the very high levels of treatment.
  • Direct impacts on water quality at the site are unlikely, but there is potential for cumulative impacts in densely farmed areas. The use of antibiotic and pesticides in Chile is high; studies on impact are limited.
General Notes
  • A zonal management approach has been adopted based on licenses (concessions); groups of licenses - Aquaculture Management Areas (AMAs); emergency disease zones - Macro Zones; and Areas Autorizadas para el ejercicio de la Acuicultura - Appropriate Areas for Aquaculture (AAA).

References

FishSource, Salmon, Chile

Good Fish Guide, Atlantic Salmon, Farmed

Seafood Watch, Farmed Atlantic Salmon, Chile

Species and Location

fishery flag

Atlantic salmon

Salmo salar

Norway

Fishery countries:
Norway

Production Methods

  • Farmed

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

Managed

Environmental Notes
  • Salmon production relies on wild capture fisheries for feed. The GLOBALG.A.P. aquaculture criteria requires ingredients used in aquaculture feed to be traceable to species level, but criteria for the sustainable content of feed are lacking. ASC certification standards require feed ingredients to be responsibly sourced and traceable back to the country of origin and/or to the fishery where the raw materials were sourced.
  • There are concerns about the impact of farmed salmon escapes and disease outbreaks on wild salmonids. The GLOBALG.A.P. and ASC standards have measures in place to manage disease outbreaks and parasites.
  • Impacts on water quality are localized, but there is potential for cumulative impacts in densely farmed areas. Chemical inputs of pesticides used to control sea lice are of particular concern for farmed Norwegian salmon and are monitored and limited by the GLOBALG.A.P. and ASC standards.
General Notes
  • The environmental impacts described are addressed to some degree by certification.
  • The Norwegian salmon industry has adopted a zonal approach to aquaculture management for licensing and disease management through the use of 13 Production Areas nationwide.

References

FishSource, Salmon, Farmed, Norway

Good Fish Guide, Atlantic salmon, Farmed; Scotland, Norway and Faroe Islands; GlobalG.A.P. certification

Good Fish Guide, Atlantic salmon, Scotland and Norway, Marine open net pen, Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC)

Seafood Watch, Atlantic Salmon, Farmed, Norway, Marine net pen

Seafood Watch, Atlantic Salmon, Farmed, Worldwide, Aquaculture Stewardship Council Certified

Species and Location

fishery flag

Barramundi

Lates calcarifer

Vietnam

Fishery countries:
Vietnam

Production Methods

  • Farmed

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

Managed

Environmental Notes
  • Profile not yet complete.
General Notes
  • No additional notes

Species and Location

fishery flag

Blue catfish

Ictalurus furcatus

US East Coast

Fishery countries:
United States

Production Methods

  • Gillnets and entangling nets

Certification or Improvement Project

Not certified or in a FIP

Sustainability Ratings

Sustainability not rated

Environmental Notes
  • Profile not yet complete.
General Notes
  • This fishery is assessed as low risk by our nonprofit science partner, Gulf of Maine Research Institute.

Species and Location

fishery flag

Blue crab

Callinectes sapidus

Chesapeake Bay

Fishery countries:
United States

Production Methods

  • Pots and traps

Certification or Improvement Project

Not certified or in a FIP

Sustainability Ratings

Managed

Environmental Notes
  • This fishery is unlikely to have a significant impact on the sea bed.
  • Profile not yet complete.
General Notes
  • This fishery is assessed as low risk by our nonprofit science partner, Gulf of Maine Research Institute.

Species and Location

fishery flag

Blue mussel

Mytilus edulis

Canada

Fishery countries:
Canada

Production Methods

  • Farmed

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

Managed

Environmental Notes
  • No feed inputs are used to support farmed mussels.
  • The larval phase of mussels may be transported away from farm sites. The spread of non-native musels and unintentionally introduced species beyond their natural range may be a cause for concern.
  • There is no concern regarding pollution from nutrients or organic matter. No feed or nutrient fertilization inputs are used to support farmed mussels, and water quality has been shown to improve at farmed mussel sites.
General Notes

References

Seafood Watch, Mussels, Farmed, Worldwide, Best Aquaculture Practices Certified BAP Mussel Standard

Species and Location

fishery flag

Bluefish

Pomatomus saltatrix

W North Atlantic

Fishery countries:
United States

Production Methods

  • Hook and line

Certification or Improvement Project

Not certified or in a FIP

Sustainability Ratings

Managed

Environmental Notes
  • There are risks to marine mammals with this fishery.
  • There is bycatch for this fishery, but the scale of the issue is not established.
  • This fishery is unlikely to have a significant impact on the sea bed.
General Notes
  • This fishery is assessed as low risk by our nonprofit science partner, Gulf of Maine Research Institute.

Species and Location

fishery flag

Channel catfish

Ictalurus punctatus

US

Fishery countries:
United States

Production Methods

  • Farmed

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

Managed

Environmental Notes
  • Very low amounts of fishmeal and fish oil are used in the catfish feed, which is made primarily from agricultural crop-derived ingredients.
  • Risks of escapes, competition with, and disease outbreaks to wild catfish are low.
  • Environmental impacts from effluents and chemical use are minimal and well-regulated.
General Notes

References

Seafood Watch, Channel Catfish, Farmed, United States, Ponds

Species and Location

fishery flag

Chum salmon

Oncorhynchus keta

Alaska - Alaska Peninsula, Aleutian Islands and Chignik

Fishery countries:
United States

Production Methods

  • Gillnets and entangling nets

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

Well managed

Environmental Notes
  • This fishery is unlikely to impact ETP species.
  • Bycatch for this fishery is considered low.
  • This fishery is unlikely to have a significant impact on the sea bed.
General Notes

References
Intertek Moody Marine, 2013, Alaska Salmon Fishery MSC Public Certification Report

Species and Location

fishery flag

Dungeness crab

Cancer magister

Alaska

Fishery countries:
United States

Production Methods

  • Pots and traps

Certification or Improvement Project

Not certified or in a FIP

Sustainability Ratings

Managed

Environmental Notes
  • Bycatch for this fishery is considered low.
  • This fishery is unlikely to have a significant impact on the sea bed.
  • Profile not yet complete.
General Notes
  • This fishery is assessed as low risk by our nonprofit science partner, Gulf of Maine Research Institute.

Species and Location

fishery flag

European seabass

Dicentrarchus labrax

Greece

Fishery countries:
Greece

Production Methods

  • Farmed

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

Managed

Environmental Notes
  • Seabass require fishmeal and fishoil from marine feed sources in their diet. Concerns about the sustainability of feed inputs are relatively minor though they are not necessarily certified sustainable.
  • Escapes are a concern and little is known about the risk of disease transfer to wild species.
  • Impacts on water quality are localized and have not been shown to have cumulative impacts beyond the immediate farm site. Chemical inputs are only used for health management and are applied in a controlled manner. Reports indicate responsible use, but there is a lack of data on the quantity of chemical inputs.
General Notes

The environmental impacts described are addressed to some degree by certification.

References

Good Fish Guide, Seabass (Farmed), Global, European Union and Turkey, Farmed by Open net pen, marine, GLOBALG.A.P.

Seafood Watch, European sea bass, Farmed, Worldwide, Indoor recirculating tanks (without wastewater treatment)

Species and Location

fishery flag

Haddock

Melanogrammus aeglefinus

Barents Sea

Fishery countries:
Norway

Production Methods

  • Bottom trawl

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

Well managed

Environmental Notes
  • This fishery is unlikely to impact ETP species, but available data is still limited.
  • Bycatch is a risk for this fishery, but there are mitigation measures in place.
  • Bottom trawls will directly impact on the sea bed. An MSC condition is in place to strengthen understanding of fishery interactions with sensitive habitat.
General Notes
  • No additional notes.

Species and Location

fishery flag

Haddock

Melanogrammus aeglefinus

Gulf of Maine

Fishery countries:
United States

Production Methods

  • Bottom trawl

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

Managed

Environmental Notes
  • This fishery is unlikely to impact ETP species.
  • Bycatch is a significant risk for this fishery.
  • Bottom trawls will directly impact on the sea bed.
General Notes
  • No additional notes

Species and Location

fishery flag

Jumbo flying squid

Dosidicus gigas

SE Pacific

Fishery countries:
Peru

Production Methods

  • Handlines and pole-lines

Certification or Improvement Project

FIP

Sustainability Ratings

Managed

Environmental Notes
  • This fishery is unlikely to impact ETP species.
  • Bycatch in this fishery is considered low.
  • This fishery is unlikely to have a significant impact on the sea bed.
General Notes

References

Fishery Progress, Peru jumbo flying squid - jig

Species and Location

fishery flag

Longfin squid

Loligo pealeii

NW Atlantic

Fishery countries:
United States

Production Methods

  • Bottom trawl

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

Well managed

Environmental Notes
  • There are risks to marine mammals, sharks, and rays with this fishery, but there are mitigation measures in place.
  • There is some risk of bycatch by bottom trawl gear.
  • Bottom trawls will directly impact on the sea bed.
General Notes
  • No additional notes.

Species and Location

fishery flag

Mahi-mahi

Coryphaena hippurus

Eastern Pacific Ocean

Fishery countries:
Peru

Production Methods

  • Longlines

Certification or Improvement Project

FIP

Sustainability Ratings

Needs improvement

Environmental Notes
  • There are risks to turtles, sharks and seabirds with this fishery.
  • Bycatch is a significant risk for this fishery.
  • This fishery is unlikely to have a significant impact on the sea bed.
General Notes

References

Fishery Progress, Peru mahi-mahi - longline (WWF)

Species and Location

fishery flag

Mahi-mahi

Coryphaena hippurus

Western and Central Pacific

Fishery countries:
Taiwan

Production Methods

  • Longlines

Certification or Improvement Project

FIP

Sustainability Ratings

Sustainability not rated

Environmental Notes
  • There are risks to turtles and seabirds with this fishery.
  • Bycatch is a risk for this fishery but there is insufficient data available to assess significance.
  • This fishery is unlikely to have a significant impact on the sea bed.
General Notes

References

Fishery Progress, Taiwan Hsin-Kang mahi-mahi - longline

Species and Location

fishery flag

Nile tilapia

Oreochromis niloticus

Colombia

Fishery countries:
Colombia

Production Methods

  • Farmed

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

Managed

Environmental Notes
  • Tilapia typically does not require large inputs of fishmeal and fish oil in commercial feeds. At least 50% of the feed used in certified production is required to be responsibly or sustainably sourced.
  • The potential impacts on wild species are limited because tilapia has been historically introduced and actively stocked into the environment.
  • The chemical use and the impact of effluent from farm operations have the potential to affect the waterbody.
General Notes

References

Seafood Watch, Farmed, Nile Tilapia, Colombia

Seafood Watch, Farmed, Tilapia, Global Aquaculture Alliance Certified BAP Standard: Tilapia Farms (2, 3, 4-star)

Species and Location

fishery flag

Nile tilapia

Oreochromis niloticus

Honduras

Fishery countries:
Honduras

Production Methods

  • Farmed

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

Managed

Environmental Notes
  • All fishmeal and fish oil is sourced from by-products.
  • Although the possibility for escape is considered high, the invasiveness factor is considered low given the prior establishment of the species. There is no current data or evidence indicating that tilapia cultured by Regal Springs, Honduras at their floating cage culture sites in Lake Yojoa and Lake Cajon are causing population declines in wild fish through the amplification and retransmission of pathogens or parasites. There is evidence that tilapia cage culture operations in Lake Yojoa and Lake Cajon attract or interact with predators or other wildlife, but the concern for wildlife and predator mortalities due to these operations is low.
  • There are moderate impacts from effluents beyond the farm boundaries. The government management system addresses the effluent water quality; however, there have been records of eutrophication and harmful phytoplankton blooms, which indicate that monitoring measures are not effective.
General Notes

Area-based approaches to aquaculture are included in the national and provincial legislation, but it is unclear whether zonal approaches to siting and production are used.

The environmental impacts described are addressed to some degree by certification.

References

Good Fish Guide, Tilapia (Farmed), Global, ASC

Seafood Watch, Tilapia, Worldwide, Aquaculture Stewardship Council Certified

Species and Location

fishery flag

North Pacific hake

Merluccius productus

NE Pacific

Fishery countries:
Canada

Production Methods

  • Midwater trawl

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

Well managed

Environmental Notes
  • This fishery is unlikely to impact ETP species.
  • Bycatch in this fishery is considered low.
  • This fishery is unlikely to have a significant impact on the sea bed.
General Notes
  • No additional notes.

Species and Location

fishery flag

Northern brown shrimp

Penaeus aztecus

NW Atlantic - US Federal

Fishery countries:
United States

Production Methods

  • Bottom trawl

Certification or Improvement Project

Not certified or in a FIP

Sustainability Ratings

Managed

Environmental Notes
  • There is potential for turtle interactions with this fishery, but excluder devices are fitted to nets for protection.
  • Bycatch is a risk for this fishery, but there are mitigation measures in place.
  • Bottom trawls will directly impact on the sea bed. However, management measures are in place.
General Notes
  • This fishery is assessed as low risk by our nonprofit science partner, Gulf of Maine Research Institute.

Species and Location

fishery flag

Pacific calico scallop

Argopecten ventricosus

Baja California Sur

Fishery countries:
Mexico

Production Methods

  • Rake / hand gathered / hand netted

Certification or Improvement Project

FIP

Sustainability Ratings

Sustainability not rated

Environmental Notes
  • This fishery is unlikely to impact ETP species.
  • Bycatch for this fishery is considered low.
  • This fishery is unlikely to have a significant impact on the sea bed.
General Notes
  • This fishery is assessed as low risk by our nonprofit science partner, Gulf of Maine Research Institute.

References

Fishery Improvement Project, Baja Scallops FIP

Species and Location

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Pacific cod

Gadus macrocephalus

Eastern Bering Sea

Fishery countries:
United States

Production Methods

  • Bottom trawl

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

Well managed

Environmental Notes
  • There are risks to seabirds and marine mammals with this fishery, but there are mitigation measures in place.
  • Bycatch is a risk for this fishery, but there is insufficient data available to assess significance.
  • Bottom trawls will directly impact on the sea bed. However, management measures are in place.
General Notes
  • No additional notes

Species and Location

fishery flag

Pacific halibut

Hippoglossus stenolepis

NE Pacific - Alaska

Fishery countries:
United States

Production Methods

  • Longlines

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

Well managed

Environmental Notes
  • There are risks to seabirds with this fishery, but mitigation actions are underway.
  • Bycatch is a risk for this fishery, but there is insufficient data available to assess significance.
  • This fishery is unlikely to have a significant impact on the sea bed.
General Notes
  • No additional notes

Species and Location

fishery flag

Peruvian calico scallop

Argopecten purpuratus

Peru

Fishery countries:
Peru

Production Methods

  • Farmed

Certification or Improvement Project

Not certified or in an AIP

Sustainability Ratings

Sustainability not rated

Environmental Notes
  • No feed inputs are used to support farmed scallops.
  • The larval phase of scallops may be transported away from farm sites. But, scallops are mostly farmed within their native range and pose little risk from escapes. Predator control methods used are low-impact and there is little risk of direct or accidental mortality of predators and other wildlife.
  • There is no concern regarding pollution from nutrients or organic matter as no feed or nutrient fertilization inputs are used to support farmed scallops.
General Notes
  • This fishery is assessed as low risk by our nonprofit science partner, Gulf of Maine Research Institute.

References

Seafood Watch, Scallops, Worldwide, Farmed

Species and Location

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Queen crab

Chionoecetes opilio

NW Atlantic - S Gulf of St. Lawrence

Fishery countries:
Canada

Production Methods

  • Pots and traps

Certification or Improvement Project

FIP

Sustainability Ratings

Well managed

Environmental Notes
  • ETP species potentially impacted by this fishery include several species of wolfish, leatherback turtles, and North Atlantic right whales (NARW), which are at serious risk. Mitigation measures are in place, but it is not possible yet to determine whether the measures undertaken are having significant effect on preventing detrimental NARW interactions.
  • This fishery is considered to be low impact with regard to bycatch of other species; however, availability of data is limited.
  • This fishery is unlikely to have a significant impact on the sea bed.
General Notes

References

Fishery Progress, Canada Gulf of St. Lawrence snow crab - pot/trap

Species and Location

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Rainbow trout

Oncorhynchus mykiss

United States

Fishery countries:
United States

Production Methods

  • Farmed

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

Managed

Environmental Notes
  • Rainbow trout is fed a high energy diet with moderate amounts of fishmeal and fish oil (approximately 20% and 6%, respectively).
  • Potential escapes pose no significant risk of additional ecological impacts.
  • Regulatory oversight of effluent and chemical use in U.S. ponds and outdoor flowthrough raceways are strong, and the industry follows best practices to minimize disease.
General Notes

References

Seafood Watch, Farmed Rainbow Trout, United States

Species and Location

fishery flag

Silver hake

Merluccius bilinearis

US Atlantic coast northern

Fishery countries:
United States

Production Methods

  • Bottom trawl

Certification or Improvement Project

Not certified or in a FIP

Sustainability Ratings

Sustainability not rated

Environmental Notes
  • Profile not yet complete.
General Notes
  • This fishery is assessed as low risk by our nonprofit science partner, Gulf of Maine Research Institute.

Species and Location

fishery flag

Snappers nei

Lutjanus spp.

Aru Bay, Arafura Sea and Eastern of Timor Sea

Fishery countries:
Indonesia

Production Methods

  • Handlines and pole-lines

Certification or Improvement Project

FIP

Sustainability Ratings

Sustainability not rated

Environmental Notes
  • This fishery is unlikely to have a significant impact on the sea bed.
  • Profile not yet complete.
General Notes

References

Fishery Progress, Indonesia deepwater groundfish - dropline, longline, trap and gillnet

Species and Location

fishery flag

Sockeye salmon

Oncorhynchus nerka

Alaska - Southeast Alaska

Fishery countries:
United States

Production Methods

  • Purse seine
  • Gillnets and entangling nets

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

Well managed

Environmental Notes
  • This fishery is unlikely to impact ETP species.
  • Bycatch for this fishery is considered low.
  • This fishery is unlikely to have a significant impact on the benthic habitat.
General Notes

References

Intertek Moody Marine, 2013, MSC Public Certification Report for the Alaska Salmon Fishery

Species and Location

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Striped bass

Morone saxatilis

US Atlantic

Fishery countries:
United States

Production Methods

  • Hook and line

Certification or Improvement Project

Not certified or in a FIP

Sustainability Ratings

Managed

Environmental Notes
  • Profile not yet complete.
General Notes
  • This fishery is assessed as low risk by our nonprofit science partner, Gulf of Maine Research Institute.

Species and Location

fishery flag

Swordfish

Xiphias gladius

North Atlantic

Fishery countries:
United States

Production Methods

  • Longlines

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

Well managed

Environmental Notes
  • Profile not yet complete.
General Notes
  • No additional notes.

Species and Location

fishery flag

Swordfish

Xiphias gladius

Northwest Pacific

Fishery countries:
Vietnam

Production Methods

  • Handlines and pole-lines

Certification or Improvement Project

FIP

Sustainability Ratings

Needs improvement

Environmental Notes
  • There are risks to sea birds as well as green, hawksbill and leatherback sea turtles with this fishery, but there are mitigation measures in place.
  • Common bycatch species in the longline fisheries include blue, shortfin mako, silky and oceanic whitetip sharks, opah, and blue, striped and black marlin, and bigeye and yellowfin tuna.
  • This fishery is unlikely to have a significant impact on the sea bed.
General Notes

References

Fishery Progress, Vietnam swordfish - handline

Species and Location

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Tilapias nei

Oreochromis spp.

China

Fishery countries:
China

Production Methods

  • Farmed

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

Managed

Environmental Notes
  • Tilapia require relatively low inputs of fishmeal and fishoil from marine feed sources in their diet. However, there are significant concerns about the sustainability of feed inputs from domestic sources, which are produced from fisheries that are fully exploited overexploited, or depleted.
  • There is little information available regarding impacts of Chinese tilapia production on wild species, including impacts from escapes, disease outbreaks, and interactions with predators and other wildlife. Nile tilapia are considered highly invasive and there are documented examples of tilapia populations outcompeting local fish species for resources in Chinese waterways. Despite this, there is no information on tilapia escapes at a farm level. In addition, there is little information about on-farm diseases in Chinese tilapia production and disease outbreaks pose a risk to wild fish populations. There is no information regarding interactions with wildlife which may include migrating birds.
  • Pollution from nutrients and organic matter, as well as chemical inputs, may affect local water quality. There is limited information regarding on-farm chemical use and the impact of effluent released by tilapia pond‐based farms in China. But there is evidence of the use of illegal chemicals and of antibiotics important to human health in Chinese tilapia production.
General Notes
  • Area-based approaches to aquaculture are included in the national and provincial legislation, but it is unclear whether zonal approaches to siting and production are used.

References:

FishSource, Tilapia, China

Seafood Watch, Tilapia, Farmed, China

Species and Location

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Vermilion snapper

Rhomboplites aurorubens

Gulf of Mexico and Western Central Atlantic

Fishery countries:
United States

Production Methods

  • Hook and line

Certification or Improvement Project

Not certified or in a FIP

Sustainability Ratings

Well managed

Environmental Notes
  • This fishery is unlikely to impact ETP species.
  • There is a lack of information on bycatch in this fishery.
  • This fishery is unlikely to have a significant impact on the sea bed.
General Notes
  • This fishery is assessed as low risk by our nonprofit science partner, Gulf of Maine Research Institute.

Species and Location

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White perch

Morone americana

Lake Erie

Fishery countries:
Canada

Production Methods

  • Gillnets and entangling nets

Certification or Improvement Project

Not certified or in a FIP

Sustainability Ratings

Sustainability not rated

Environmental Notes
  • There are risks to ETP species with this fishery, but there is insufficient data available to assess significance.
  • Bycatch is a risk for this fishery, but there is insufficient data available to assess significance.
  • Profile not yet complete.
General Notes
  • This fishery is assessed as low risk by our nonprofit science partner, Gulf of Maine Research Institute.

Species and Location

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Whiteleg shrimp

Penaeus vannamei

China

Fishery countries:
China

Production Methods

  • Farmed

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

Managed

Environmental Notes
  • Fishmeal and fish oil from marine feed sources are used. At least 50% of the feed used in certified production is required to be responsibly or sustainably sourced.
  • Biosecurity measures minimise disease outbreaks and escapes.
  • Chemical usage and effluent are monitored and limited.
General Notes
  • The government has adopted a farm-based approach to aquaculture regulations and licensing.

References

FishSource - Shrimp, China

Good Fish Guide - Prawn, King (whiteleg), prawns, Global, GAA BAP 4*

Good Fish Guide - Prawn, King (whiteleg), prawns, Global, GAA BAP 2 and 3*

Seafood Watch, Whiteleg shrimp, Farmed, Global Aquaculture Alliance Certified BAP Standard: Finfish and Crustacean Farms (2, 3, 4-star)

Species and Location

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Whiteleg shrimp

Penaeus vannamei

India

Fishery countries:
India

Production Methods

  • Farmed

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

Managed

Environmental Notes
  • Fishmeal and fish oil from marine feed sources are used. At least 50% of the feed used in certified production is required to be responsibly or sustainably sourced.
  • Disease transfer between farmed and wild prawns is a concern but infrequent water exchange on whiteleg shrimp farms moderates the risk. Whiteleg shrimp are not native to India and there is potential for ecological impacts from escapes.
  • Pollution from nutrients and organic matter, as well as chemical inputs, may affect local water quality. Waste discharge from whiteleg shrimp ponds is typically limited to once per production cycle.
General Notes
  • The aquaculture industry is currently managed under a farm-based approach.
  • Shrimp farms are managed by the Coastal Aquaculture Authority through the Coastal Aquaculture Authority CAA Act and Guidelines, which acknowledge the importance of zonal management.

References

FishSource, Shrimp, India

Good Fish Guide, King prawn (farmed), India, Vietnam and Indonesia

Seafood Watch, Farmed whiteleg shrimp, India

Species and Location

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Whiteleg shrimp

Penaeus vannamei

Indonesia

Fishery countries:
Indonesia

Production Methods

  • Farmed

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

Managed

Environmental Notes
  • Fishmeal and fish oil from marine feed sources are used. At least 50% of the feed used in certified production is required to be responsibly or sustainably sourced.
  • Disease transfer between farmed and wild prawns is a concern but infrequent water exchange on whiteleg shrimp farms moderates the risk. Whiteleg shrimp are not native to Indonesia and there is potential for ecological impacts from escapes.
  • Pollution from nutrients and organic matter, as well as chemical inputs, may affect local water quality. Impacts of individual farms are likely to be small but cumulative impacts may occur.
General Notes
  • The Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries (MMAF) has developed a coastal and marine spatial plan that identifies multiple aquaculture zones, but there is no evidence that it has been implemented at a province level.

References

FishSource, Shrimp, India

Good Fish Guide, King prawn (farmed), India, Vietnam and Indonesia

Seafood Watch, Farmed Whiteleg Shrimp, Indonesia, Ponds

Species and Location

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Yellowfin sole

Limanda aspera

Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands

Fishery countries:
United States

Production Methods

  • Bottom trawl

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

Well managed

Environmental Notes
  • In terms of endangered, protected and threatened (ETP) species, this fishery recorded catches of big skate. Bottom trawling is prohibited in waters near rookeries and haulouts to protect Steller sea lions and walruses, as well as seasonally or permanently in extensive areas of the eastern Bering Sea to minimize bycatch and habitat impacts that might affect other fisheries in the region.

  • The most common bycatch by weight in the fishery is Alaska plaice, followed by rock sole, pollock, pacific cod, flathead sole, sculpins, arrowtooth flounder and skates. Special limitations on bottom trawling apply in several areas to avoid impacts to crab, herring, chum and Chinook salmon.
  • Bottom trawls will directly impact on the sea bed.
General Notes

References

MRAG Americas, 2015, MSC Public Certification Report for Bering Sea-Aleutian Islands Alaska Flatfish Fishery

Species and Location

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Yellowfin tuna

Thunnus albacares

Western and Central Pacific Ocean

Fishery countries:
Vietnam

Production Methods

  • Longlines

Certification or Improvement Project

FIP

Sustainability Ratings

Managed

Environmental Notes
  • There is a risk to ETP species with this fishery. Longlines present a hazard to turtles, seabirds and sharks, but these risks can be reduced through proper management of fishing gear.
  • There is bycatch for this fishery but the scale of the issue is not established.
  • This fishery is unlikely to have a significant impact on the sea bed.
General Notes

References

Fishery Progress, Vietnam yellowfin tuna - longline/handline

Profile Download

ODP profiles from previous years are available to download as PDFs below.