Greencore

Greencore Group plc is a leading manufacturer of convenience foods. We are proud to supply a wide range of chilled, frozen and ambient foods to the most successful retail and food service customers in the UK. We employ approximately 12,200 colleagues across our operations, which consist of 21 production units at 16 locations, four regional distribution centres and 14 transport hubs.

Within the regions we serve, we have strong market positions in grocery sandwiches, sushi and Italian chilled ready meals, as well as own label ambient cooking sauces and pickles. Fish and seafood are critical resources for our planet, and they are also key ingredients in Greencore’s products which is why we take pride in being transparent and work hard to ensure the wild-caught and farmed fish and seafood used in our products comes from responsible sources.


% volume from MSC certified (61.95%) and FIP fisheries (14.7%)
% volume uncertified (Tuna Pole & Line 95.5%, Other 4.5%)
% tuna from pole and line, certified (MSC) or FIP fisheries
% volume from certified farms (GlobalG.A.P., ASC or BAP 4-star)
% warm water prawns from certified farms (BAP 4-star)

% volume from MSC certified (61.95%) and FIP fisheries (14.7%)

76.6

% volume uncertified (Tuna Pole & Line 95.5%, Other 4.5%)

23.3

% tuna from pole and line, certified (MSC) or FIP fisheries

98.8

% volume from certified farms (GlobalG.A.P., ASC or BAP 4-star)

99.9

% warm water prawns from certified farms (BAP 4-star)

100

Production Methods Used
    • Midwater trawl
    • Bottom trawl
    • Purse seine
    • Gillnets and entangling nets
    • Handlines and pole-lines
    • Pots and traps
    • Farmed
Summary

Our Vision

At Greencore, we are passionate about playing our part in building a fairer and more resilient food system for generations to come. Our Better Future Plan is built around three pillars: Sourcing with Integrity, Making with Care and Feeding with Pride. Each pillar contains a set of priorities — with aspirational goals supported by milestone targets which relate to the most pressing sustainability challenges, risks and opportunities facing us as a business and the food system we operate within. They encompass the issues that matter most to our stakeholders and represent the areas where we can drive meaningful and positive change.

Our approach to sourcing

By Sourcing with Integrity, we hope to demonstrate leadership on transparency for our sector. By 2030 we aim to responsibly source 100% of our priority raw materials. In order to achieve this aim, we need to define both “responsibly sourced” and “priority raw materials”; we do this within our Responsible Sourcing Policy and through a process of risk assessment. We are focusing on priority ingredients that carry the greatest sourcing risks from three areas — forest, fisheries and field. It is not possible to have a ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach to ingredients. Each individual supply chain comes with its own challenges around biodiversity, climate change, water scarcity, deforestation and animal welfare.

Greencore supports GSSI recognised certification as we believe it drives change. We aim to source all our fish and seafood from fisheries and farming operations which have been independently certified. For farmed fish and seafood, we recognise three certification standards: Global Aquaculture Alliance Best Aquaculture Practices (4*), Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC), Global GAP (Good Agriculture Practices). We also seek certification for our wild caught seafood products where Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) is the preferred certification standard. We will work with suppliers with a Fishery Improvement Project (FIP) in place when there is a plan to gain MSC certification.

Our focus on human rights

At Greencore our goal is to source all of our seafood from a sustainable and fair supply chain. Human Rights is central to this ambition, and we are determined to ensure that the workers in our seafood supply chains are treated fairly. We apply a risk assessment approach to the challenge of international human rights, identifying hot spots with the greatest worker welfare challenges by applying insights from the Food Network for Ethical Trade Risk Assessment Tool, Sedex data, and seafood supplier insights. Collaboration is central to resolving human rights challenges in complex international supply chains and we work with our customers and suppliers in a transparent and collaborative partnership to address the theme of exploitation wherever we find it. We are active members of the Food Network for Ethical Trade and the Modern Slavery Intelligence Network.

This profile covers all wild-caught and farmed seafood sourced for Greencore in Financial Year 2021 (September 2020 – October 2021).

Associated Fisheries

Species and Location
Production Methods
Certification or Improvement Project
Sustainability Ratings
Notes

Species and Location

fishery flag

Alaska pollock

Theragra chalcogramma

Aleutian Islands

Fishery countries:
U.S.

Production Methods

  • Midwater trawl

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

FishSource

Well Managed

FishSource

  • Well Managed
  • Managed
  • Needs Improvement

Seafood Watch

Eco-Certification Recommended

Seafood Watch

  • Eco-Certification Recommended
  • Best Choice
  • Good Alternative
  • Avoid

Good Fish Guide

Best Choice 1

Good Fish Guide

  • Best Choice 1
  • Best Choice 2
  • Think 3
  • Think 4
  • Improver 5
  • Avoid 5

Ocean Wise

Recommended

Ocean Wise

  • Recommended
  • Not recommended

NOAA FSSI

4

NOAA FSSI

  • 0
  • 0.5
  • 1
  • 1.5
  • 2
  • 2.5
  • 3
  • 4
Environmental Notes
  • This fishery is unlikely to have direct impacts on PET species.
  • Bycatch for this fishery is considered low.
  • This fishery is unlikely to have a significant impact on the sea bed.
General Notes
  • This fish plays an important role in the marine food web and so potential impacts on the wider marine ecosystem must be monitored.

Species and Location

fishery flag

American lobster

Homarus americanus

Gulf of Maine and Georges Bank - US Gulf of Maine

Fishery countries:
U.S.

Production Methods

  • Pots and traps

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

FishSource

Well Managed

FishSource

  • Well Managed
  • Managed
  • Needs Improvement

Good Fish Guide

Think 4

Good Fish Guide

  • Best Choice 1
  • Best Choice 2
  • Think 3
  • Think 4
  • Improver 5
  • Avoid 5
Environmental Notes
  • The most significant environmental concern for this fishery relates to potential impacts on PET species. The risk of entanglement of the endangered North Atlantic right whale in lobster gear is a serious concern, but new management measures are in place to reduce the likelihood of the fishery interacting with whales.
  • Bycatch for this fishery is considered low.
  • This fishery is unlikely to have a significant impact on the sea bed.
General Notes
  • During the reporting period, the certification for this fishery was temporarily suspended from 31 August 2020 and reinstated, effective 1 September 2021, following improvements to the management system regarding interactions between the lobster fishery and North Atlantic right whales.

References

Stakeholder Announcement: Gulf of Maine lobster suspension lifted, October 2021

Species and Location

fishery flag

Argentine hake

Merluccius hubbsi

Patagonian

Fishery countries:
Argentina

Production Methods

  • Bottom trawl

Certification or Improvement Project

Not certified or in a FIP

Sustainability Ratings

FishSource

Managed

FishSource

  • Well Managed
  • Managed
  • Needs Improvement
Environmental Notes
  • There are risks to sharks, skates and seabirds with this fishery.
  • Bycatch for this fishery is a risk, but there is insufficient data available to assess significance.
  • Bottom trawls will directly impact on the sea bed. However, management measures are in place.
General Notes
  • No additional notes

Species and Location

fishery flag

Atlantic cod

Gadus morhua

Barents Sea

Fishery countries:
Russia

Production Methods

  • Bottom trawl

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

FishSource

Well Managed

FishSource

  • Well Managed
  • Managed
  • Needs Improvement

Seafood Watch

Eco-Certification Recommended

Seafood Watch

  • Eco-Certification Recommended
  • Best Choice
  • Good Alternative
  • Avoid

Good Fish Guide

Best Choice 2

Good Fish Guide

  • Best Choice 1
  • Best Choice 2
  • Think 3
  • Think 4
  • Improver 5
  • Avoid 5
Environmental Notes
  • There are concerns about the cumulative impacts of the Barents Sea fishery upon the endangered species, golden redfish.
  • There is bycatch for this fishery but non-target species are retained. Management measures are in place to reduce impacts on retained species.
  • Bottom trawls will directly impact on the sea bed. Management measures are in place to limit impacts on benthic habitats.
General Notes
  • No additional notes.

Species and Location

fishery flag

Atlantic salmon

Salmo salar

Norway

Fishery countries:
Norway

Production Methods

  • Farmed

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

Good Fish Guide

Think 3

Good Fish Guide

  • Best Choice 1
  • Best Choice 2
  • Think 3
  • Think 4
  • Improver 5
  • Avoid 5
Environmental Notes
  • Salmon rely on wild capture fisheries for feed, but responsible sourcing of inputs is encouraged for certified salmon.
  • There are concerns about the impact of farmed salmon escapes and disease outbreaks on wild salmonids. In addition, concerns have been expressed about the impact on wild wrasse populations used as cleaner fish to control sea lice.
  • Impacts on water quality are localized, but there is potential for cumulative impacts in densely farmed areas. Chemical inputs of pesticides used to control sea lice are of particular concern for farmed Norwegian salmon, but the use of non-chemical treatments for sea lice is increasing.
General Notes
  • The environmental impacts described are addressed to some degree by certification.
  • The Norwegian salmon industry has adopted a zonal approach to aquaculture management.

References:

FishSource - salmon, Norway

Good Fish Guide - Salmon, Atlantic (Farmed), Scotland, Norway and Faroe Islands, GlobalG.A.P. certification

Seafood Watch report for farmed salmon, Norway

Species and Location

fishery flag

Atlantic salmon

Salmo salar

United Kingdom

Fishery countries:
U.K.

Production Methods

  • Farmed

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

Good Fish Guide

Think 3

Good Fish Guide

  • Best Choice 1
  • Best Choice 2
  • Think 3
  • Think 4
  • Improver 5
  • Avoid 5
Environmental Notes
  • Salmon rely on wild capture fisheries for feed, but responsible sourcing of inputs is encouraged for certified salmon.
  • There are concerns about the impact of farmed salmon escapes and disease outbreaks on wild salmonids. In addition, concerns have been expressed about the impact on wild wrasse populations used as cleaner fish to control sea lice.
  • Impacts on water quality are localized, but there is potential for cumulative impacts in densely farmed areas. Chemical inputs of pesticides used to control sea lice are of particular concern for farmed Scottish salmon.
General Notes
  • The environmental impacts described are addressed to some degree by certification.
  • The industry follows a zonal approach to aquaculture management with respect to planning, siting, licensing, and operation.

References:

FishSource - salmon, United Kingdom

Good Fish Guide - Salmon, Atlantic (Farmed), Scotland, Norway and Faroe Islands, GlobalG.A.P. certification

Seafood Watch report for farmed salmon, Scotland

Species and Location

fishery flag

Edible crab

Cancer pagurus

Orkney

Fishery countries:
U.K.

Production Methods

  • Pots and traps

Certification or Improvement Project

Some product from FIP fisheries

Sustainability Ratings

Good Fish Guide

Think 3

Good Fish Guide

  • Best Choice 1
  • Best Choice 2
  • Think 3
  • Think 4
  • Improver 5
  • Avoid 5
Environmental Notes
  • There are risks to sea turtles and marine mammals of entanglement in pot ropes with this fishery.
  • Bycatch for this fishery is considered low. Non-target species are usually released alive.
  • This fishery is unlikely to have a significant impact on the sea bed.
General Notes
  • This fishery formally re-entered into a FIP in July 2021 due to limitations within the current regulatory framework that crab are managed under in Scotland.

References

FisheryProgress, UK Orkney brown crab - pot

Species and Location

fishery flag

Northern prawn

Pandalus borealis

Barents Sea

Fishery countries:
Norway

Production Methods

  • Bottom trawl

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

FishSource

Well Managed

FishSource

  • Well Managed
  • Managed
  • Needs Improvement

Seafood Watch

Eco-Certification Recommended

Seafood Watch

  • Eco-Certification Recommended
  • Best Choice
  • Good Alternative
  • Avoid

Good Fish Guide

Best Choice 2

Good Fish Guide

  • Best Choice 1
  • Best Choice 2
  • Think 3
  • Think 4
  • Improver 5
  • Avoid 5

Ocean Wise

Recommended

Ocean Wise

  • Recommended
  • Not recommended
Environmental Notes
  • This fishery is unlikely to impact PET species.
  • Bycatch in this fishery is considered low.
  • Bottom trawls will directly impact on the sea bed but the fishery is considered unlikely to cause serious and irreversible harm to habitats.
General Notes
  • This fish species plays an important role in the marine food web and so potential impacts on the wider marine ecosystem must be monitored.

References

DNG GL, 2018, Public Certification Report for the Re-assessment of the Norway North East Arctic cold water prawn fishery

Species and Location

fishery flag

Northern prawn

Pandalus borealis

Nunavut and Nunavik Western

Fishery countries:
Canada

Production Methods

  • Bottom trawl

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

FishSource

Well Managed

FishSource

  • Well Managed
  • Managed
  • Needs Improvement

Seafood Watch

Eco-Certification Recommended

Seafood Watch

  • Eco-Certification Recommended
  • Best Choice
  • Good Alternative
  • Avoid

Ocean Wise

Recommended

Ocean Wise

  • Recommended
  • Not recommended
Environmental Notes
  • There are risks to seabirds with this fishery, but there is insufficient data available to assess significance.
  • Bycatch of non-target species is considered low and mitigation measures are in place.
  • Bottom trawls will directly impact on the sea bed.
General Notes
  • This fish plays an important role in the marine food web and so potential impacts on the wider marine ecosystem must be monitored.

Species and Location

fishery flag

Northern prawn

Pandalus borealis

Western Greenland

Fishery countries:
Greenland

Production Methods

  • Bottom trawl

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

FishSource

Well Managed

FishSource

  • Well Managed
  • Managed
  • Needs Improvement

Seafood Watch

Eco-Certification Recommended

Seafood Watch

  • Eco-Certification Recommended
  • Best Choice
  • Good Alternative
  • Avoid

Good Fish Guide

Best Choice 2

Good Fish Guide

  • Best Choice 1
  • Best Choice 2
  • Think 3
  • Think 4
  • Improver 5
  • Avoid 5

Ocean Wise

Recommended

Ocean Wise

  • Recommended
  • Not recommended
Environmental Notes
  • This fishery is unlikely to impact PET species.
  • Bycatch for this fishery is considered low.
  • Bottom trawls will directly impact on the sea bed.
General Notes
  • This species plays an important role in the marine food web and so potential impacts on the wider marine ecosystem must be monitored.

Species and Location

fishery flag

Pink salmon

Oncorhynchus gorbuscha

Alaska

Fishery countries:
U.S.

Production Methods

  • Gillnets and entangling nets

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

FishSource

Well Managed

FishSource

  • Well Managed
  • Managed
  • Needs Improvement

Seafood Watch

Eco-Certification Recommended

Seafood Watch

  • Eco-Certification Recommended
  • Best Choice
  • Good Alternative
  • Avoid

Good Fish Guide

Best Choice 2

Good Fish Guide

  • Best Choice 1
  • Best Choice 2
  • Think 3
  • Think 4
  • Improver 5
  • Avoid 5

Ocean Wise

Recommended

Ocean Wise

  • Recommended
  • Not recommended
Environmental Notes
  • While encounters with marine mammals and birds have been documented in this fishery, the impact on PET species is not thought to be significant.
  • There is no risk of bycatch for this fishery. Catches of other salmon species are accounted for in the pink salmon management.
  • This fishery is unlikely to have a significant impact on the benthic habitat.
General Notes

References
MRAG Americas, April 2019, MSC 3rd Reassessment Report for Alaska Salmon Fishery.

Species and Location

fishery flag

Rainbow Trout, Steelhead Trout

Oncorhynchus mykiss

United Kingdom

Fishery countries:
U.K.

Production Methods

  • Farmed

Certification or Improvement Project

Not certified or in an AIP

Sustainability Ratings

Sustainability not rated

Environmental Notes
  • Trout have a high requirement for fish in their diet.
  • Escapes are unlikely to have a significant impact on wild trout populations. Producers are permitted to use lethal control on predators.
  • Impacts on water quality depend on the farming method used. Production using open net cages and ponds results in the discharge of waste and nutrients directly into the surrounding water.
General Notes
  • This product is certified to a non-GSSI recognised aquaculture certification standard. The environmental impacts described are addressed to some degree by certification.

References

Good Fish Guide - Rainbow trout

Species and Location

fishery flag

Skipjack tuna

Katsuwonus pelamis

Eastern Atlantic Ocean

Fishery countries:
Guatemala

Production Methods

  • FAD-free (unassociated) purse seine

Certification or Improvement Project

FIP

Sustainability Ratings

FishSource

Needs Improvement

FishSource

  • Well Managed
  • Managed
  • Needs Improvement

Seafood Watch

Good Alternative

Seafood Watch

  • Eco-Certification Recommended
  • Best Choice
  • Good Alternative
  • Avoid

Good Fish Guide

Think 4

Good Fish Guide

  • Best Choice 1
  • Best Choice 2
  • Think 3
  • Think 4
  • Improver 5
  • Avoid 5

Ocean Wise

Recommended

Ocean Wise

  • Recommended
  • Not recommended
Environmental Notes
  • There are risks to sharks, marine mammals, and sea turtles in this fishery.
  • Bycatch is a risk in this fishery. The risk of bycatch in unassociated (FAD-free) purse seine fisheries is lower than in associated purse seine fisheries.
  • This fishery is unlikely to have a significant impact on the sea bed.
General Notes

References

FisheryProgress, Atlantic Ocean tropical tuna - purse seine (OPAGAC)

Good Fish Guide - Tuna, skipjack, Purse seine (FAD & Free School), East Atlantic

Seafood Watch Recommendation for Skipjack tuna, Eastern Atlantic, Unassociated purse seine (non-FAD)

Species and Location

fishery flag

Skipjack tuna

Katsuwonus pelamis

Eastern Atlantic Ocean

Fishery countries:
Senegal

Production Methods

  • Handlines and pole-lines

Certification or Improvement Project

FIP

Sustainability Ratings

FishSource

Needs Improvement

FishSource

  • Well Managed
  • Managed
  • Needs Improvement

Seafood Watch

Good Alternative

Seafood Watch

  • Eco-Certification Recommended
  • Best Choice
  • Good Alternative
  • Avoid

Good Fish Guide

Think 3

Good Fish Guide

  • Best Choice 1
  • Best Choice 2
  • Think 3
  • Think 4
  • Improver 5
  • Avoid 5

Ocean Wise

Recommended

Ocean Wise

  • Recommended
  • Not recommended
Environmental Notes
  • This fishery is unlikely to impact PET species; incidental capture of PET species by pole-and-line gear is uncommon.
  • Bycatch for this fishery is considered low, but there are concerns about unknown impacts on bait fish used in the fishery.
  • This fishery is unlikely to have a significant impact on the sea bed.
General Notes

References

FisheryProgress, Eastern Atlantic Ocean tuna - pole & line FIP

Good Fish Guide - Tuna, skipjack, Pole & line; Troll, East Atlantic

Seafood Watch Recommendation for Skipjack tuna, Eastern Atlantic, Handlines and hand-operated pole-and-lines

Species and Location

fishery flag

Skipjack tuna

Katsuwonus pelamis

Indian Ocean

Fishery countries:
Indonesia

Production Methods

  • Handlines and pole-lines

Certification or Improvement Project

Some product from FIP fisheries

Sustainability Ratings

FishSource

Well Managed

FishSource

  • Well Managed
  • Managed
  • Needs Improvement

Seafood Watch

Avoid

Seafood Watch

  • Eco-Certification Recommended
  • Best Choice
  • Good Alternative
  • Avoid

Good Fish Guide

Best Choice 2

Good Fish Guide

  • Best Choice 1
  • Best Choice 2
  • Think 3
  • Think 4
  • Improver 5
  • Avoid 5

Ocean Wise

Recommended

Ocean Wise

  • Recommended
  • Not recommended
Environmental Notes
  • This fishery is unlikely to impact PET species.
  • Bycatch for this fishery is considered low.
  • This fishery is unlikely to have a significant impact on the sea bed.
General Notes

References

FisheryProgress, Indonesia Indian Ocean skipjack tuna - pole & line

Species and Location

fishery flag

Skipjack tuna

Katsuwonus pelamis

Indian Ocean

Fishery countries:
Maldives

Production Methods

  • Handlines and pole-lines

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

FishSource

Well Managed

FishSource

  • Well Managed
  • Managed
  • Needs Improvement

Good Fish Guide

Best Choice 2

Good Fish Guide

  • Best Choice 1
  • Best Choice 2
  • Think 3
  • Think 4
  • Improver 5
  • Avoid 5

Ocean Wise

Recommended

Ocean Wise

  • Recommended
  • Not recommended
Environmental Notes
  • This fishery is unlikely to impact PET species.
  • Bycatch for this fishery is considered low.
  • This fishery is unlikely to have a significant impact on the sea bed.
General Notes
  • No additional notes.

Species and Location

fishery flag

Skipjack tuna

Katsuwonus pelamis

Western and Central Pacific Ocean - WCPFC

Fishery countries:
Indonesia

Production Methods

  • Handlines and pole-lines

Certification or Improvement Project

Some product from FIP fisheries

Sustainability Ratings

FishSource

Needs Improvement

FishSource

  • Well Managed
  • Managed
  • Needs Improvement

Seafood Watch

Best Choice

Seafood Watch

  • Eco-Certification Recommended
  • Best Choice
  • Good Alternative
  • Avoid

Good Fish Guide

Best Choice 2

Good Fish Guide

  • Best Choice 1
  • Best Choice 2
  • Think 3
  • Think 4
  • Improver 5
  • Avoid 5

Ocean Wise

Recommended

Ocean Wise

  • Recommended
  • Not recommended
Environmental Notes
  • This fishery is unlikely to impact PET species.
  • Bycatch for this fishery is considered low.
  • This fishery is unlikely to have a significant impact on the sea bed.
General Notes

References

FisheryProgress, Indonesia Western and Central Pacific Ocean skipjack tuna - pole and line

Species and Location

fishery flag

Skipjack tuna

Katsuwonus pelamis

Western and Central Pacific Ocean

Fishery countries:
Philippines

Production Methods

  • Purse seine

Certification or Improvement Project

Not certified or in a FIP

Sustainability Ratings

FishSource

Managed

FishSource

  • Well Managed
  • Managed
  • Needs Improvement

Seafood Watch

Avoid

Seafood Watch

  • Eco-Certification Recommended
  • Best Choice
  • Good Alternative
  • Avoid

Good Fish Guide

Think 3

Good Fish Guide

  • Best Choice 1
  • Best Choice 2
  • Think 3
  • Think 4
  • Improver 5
  • Avoid 5

Ocean Wise

Not recommended

Ocean Wise

  • Recommended
  • Not recommended
Environmental Notes
  • There are risks to sharks, marine mammals, and sea turtles in this fishery.
  • Bycatch is a risk in this fishery. The risk of bycatch in associated (FAD) purse seine fisheries is higher than in unassociated purse seine fisheries.
  • This fishery is unlikely to have a significant impact on the sea bed.
General Notes

References

Good Fish Guide - Skipjack tuna, Western and Central Pacific, Net (purse seine on aggregating devices or free-schooling fish)

Species and Location

fishery flag

Skipjack tuna

Katsuwonus pelamis

Western Atlantic Ocean

Fishery countries:
Brazil

Production Methods

  • Handlines and pole-lines

Certification or Improvement Project

Not certified or in a FIP

Sustainability Ratings

FishSource

Managed

FishSource

  • Well Managed
  • Managed
  • Needs Improvement

Seafood Watch

Good Alternative

Seafood Watch

  • Eco-Certification Recommended
  • Best Choice
  • Good Alternative
  • Avoid

Good Fish Guide

Think 3

Good Fish Guide

  • Best Choice 1
  • Best Choice 2
  • Think 3
  • Think 4
  • Improver 5
  • Avoid 5

Ocean Wise

Not recommended

Ocean Wise

  • Recommended
  • Not recommended
Environmental Notes
  • This fishery is unlikely to impact PET species.
  • Bycatch for this fishery is considered low. But the use of live fish for bait may affect baitfish populations.
  • This fishery is unlikely to have a significant impact on the sea bed.
General Notes
  • No additional notes.

Species and Location

fishery flag

Sockeye salmon

Oncorhynchus nerka

Alaska

Fishery countries:
U.S.

Production Methods

  • Gillnets and entangling nets

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

FishSource

Well Managed

FishSource

  • Well Managed
  • Managed
  • Needs Improvement

Seafood Watch

Eco-Certification Recommended

Seafood Watch

  • Eco-Certification Recommended
  • Best Choice
  • Good Alternative
  • Avoid

Good Fish Guide

Best Choice 2

Good Fish Guide

  • Best Choice 1
  • Best Choice 2
  • Think 3
  • Think 4
  • Improver 5
  • Avoid 5

Ocean Wise

Recommended

Ocean Wise

  • Recommended
  • Not recommended
Environmental Notes
  • This fishery is unlikely to impact PET species.
  • Bycatch for this fishery is considered low.
  • This fishery is unlikely to have a significant impact on the benthic habitat.
General Notes

References

MRAG Americas, 2019, MSC 3rd Assessment Report Public Certification Report for the Alaska Salmon Fishery

Species and Location

fishery flag

Whiteleg shrimp

Penaeus vannamei

Honduras

Fishery countries:
Honduras

Production Methods

  • Farmed

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

Seafood Watch

Eco-Certification Recommended

Seafood Watch

  • Eco-Certification Recommended
  • Best Choice
  • Good Alternative
  • Avoid

Good Fish Guide

Think 3

Good Fish Guide

  • Best Choice 1
  • Best Choice 2
  • Think 3
  • Think 4
  • Improver 5
  • Avoid 5

Ocean Wise

Not recommended

Ocean Wise

  • Recommended
  • Not recommended
Environmental Notes
  • The use of wild fish in Honduran shrimp feed inputs is low.
  • Disease transfer between farmed and wild prawns is a concern and is exacerbated by the practice of frequent water exchanges. Information on escapes from shrimp farms is limited. Whiteleg shrimp are native to Honduras, therefore lowering the environmental risk from escapes, however there is still potential for interbreeding with wild shrimp populations to result in reduced genetic fitness.
  • Pollution from nutrients and organic matter, as well as chemical inputs, may affect local water quality. Impacts on water quality vary depending on farm practices including the frequency of waste discharge from ponds. Some farms have been found to exceed regulatory limits for waste discharge.
General Notes
  • The environmental impacts described are addressed to some degree by certification.

References:

Good Fish Guide - King prawn, Global, Global Aquaculture Alliance Best Aquaculture Practices (GAA BAP) 4* certification

Seafood Watch Recommended Eco-Certifications for Whiteleg shrimp

Seafood Watch report for farmed shrimp, Honduras

Species and Location

fishery flag

Whiteleg shrimp

Penaeus vannamei

Indonesia

Fishery countries:
Indonesia

Production Methods

  • Farmed

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

Seafood Watch

Eco-Certification Recommended

Seafood Watch

  • Eco-Certification Recommended
  • Best Choice
  • Good Alternative
  • Avoid

Good Fish Guide

Think 3

Good Fish Guide

  • Best Choice 1
  • Best Choice 2
  • Think 3
  • Think 4
  • Improver 5
  • Avoid 5
Environmental Notes
  • Fishmeal and fish oil from marine feed sources are used. Certification criteria encourage the use of responsibly sourced marine products in feed.
  • Disease transfer between farmed and wild prawns is a concern. Whiteleg shrimp are not native to Indonesia and there is potential for ecological impacts from escapes.
  • Pollution from nutrients and organic matter, as well as chemical inputs, may affect local water quality and cumulative impacts across a region may occur.
General Notes
  • The environmental impacts described are addressed to some degree by certification.
  • Legislation on zonal planning that is relevant to aquaculture does exist. A zonal approach to aquaculture is being introduced via an Aquaculture Improvement Project (AIP) in Muncar, Banyuwangi district, East Java.

References:

FishSource - Shrimp, Indonesia

Good Fish Guide - King prawns, Global, Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC)

Good Fish Guide - Prawns, King (whiteleg), prawns, Global Aquaculture Alliance Best Aquaculture Practices (GAA BAP) 4* certified

Seafood Watch Recommended Eco-Certifications for Whiteleg shrimp

Seafood Watch report for farmed shrimp, Indonesia

Species and Location

fishery flag

Whiteleg shrimp

Penaeus vannamei

Thailand

Fishery countries:
Thailand

Production Methods

  • Farmed

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

Seafood Watch

Eco-Certification Recommended

Seafood Watch

  • Eco-Certification Recommended
  • Best Choice
  • Good Alternative
  • Avoid

Good Fish Guide

Think 3

Good Fish Guide

  • Best Choice 1
  • Best Choice 2
  • Think 3
  • Think 4
  • Improver 5
  • Avoid 5

Ocean Wise

Not recommended

Ocean Wise

  • Recommended
  • Not recommended
Environmental Notes
  • Fishmeal and fish oil from marine feed sources are used. At least 50% of the feed used in certified production is required to be responsibly or sustainably sourced.
  • Disease transfer between farmed and wild prawns is a concern but infrequent water exchange on whiteleg shrimp farms moderates the risk. Whiteleg shrimp are not native to Thailand and there is potential for ecological impacts from escapes.
  • Pollution from nutrients and organic matter, as well as chemical inputs, may affect local water quality. Impacts on water quality vary depending on the frequency of waste discharge from ponds.
General Notes
  • The environmental impacts described are addressed to some degree by certification.
  • Public information on zonal approaches to planning and production of shrimp farming in Thailand is limited.

References:

FishSource - Shrimp, Thailand

Good Fish Guide - King prawn, Global, Global Aquaculture Alliance Best Aquaculture Practices (GAA BAP) 4* certification

Seafood Watch Recommended Eco-Certifications for Whiteleg shrimp, Farmed

Species and Location

fishery flag

Whiteleg shrimp

Penaeus vannamei

Vietnam

Fishery countries:
Vietnam

Production Methods

  • Farmed

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

Seafood Watch

Eco-Certification Recommended

Seafood Watch

  • Eco-Certification Recommended
  • Best Choice
  • Good Alternative
  • Avoid

Good Fish Guide

Think 3

Good Fish Guide

  • Best Choice 1
  • Best Choice 2
  • Think 3
  • Think 4
  • Improver 5
  • Avoid 5
Environmental Notes
  • Fishmeal and fish oil from marine feed sources are used. At least 50% of the feed used in certified production is required to be responsibly or sustainably sourced.
  • Disease transfer between farmed and wild prawns is a concern but infrequent water exchange on whiteleg shrimp farms moderates this risk. Whiteleg shrimp are not native to Vietnam and there is potential for ecological impacts from escapes.
  • Pollution from nutrients and organic matter, as well as chemical inputs, may affect local water quality. Waste discharge from whiteleg shrimp ponds is typically limited to once per production cycle, moderating the impact of effluents on water quality. There is a lack of data on the quantity of chemical inputs, but evidence suggests that illegal antibiotics are sometimes used on Vietnamese shrimp farms.
General Notes
  • The environmental impacts described are addressed to some degree by certification.
  • The aquaculture industry is currently managed under a farm-based approach

References:

FishSource - shrimp, Vietnam

Good Fish Guide - King prawn, Global, Global Aquaculture Alliance Best Aquaculture Practices (GAA BAP) 4* certification

Seafood Watch Recommended Eco-Certifications for Whiteleg shrimp, Farmed

Seafood Watch report for farmed shrimp, Vietnam

Species and Location

fishery flag

Whiteleg shrimp

Penaeus vannamei

Vietnam

Fishery countries:
Vietnam

Production Methods

  • Farmed

Certification or Improvement Project

Certified

Sustainability Ratings

Good Fish Guide

Think 3

Good Fish Guide

  • Best Choice 1
  • Best Choice 2
  • Think 3
  • Think 4
  • Improver 5
  • Avoid 5
Environmental Notes
  • Fishmeal and fishoil from marine feed sources are used. Certification criteria encourage the use of responsibly sourced marine products in feed.
  • Disease transfer between farmed and wild prawns is a concern but infrequent water exchange on whiteleg shrimp farms moderates this risk. Whiteleg shrimp are not native to Vietnam and there is potential for ecological impacts from escapes.
  • Pollution from nutrients and organic matter, as well as chemical inputs, may affect local water quality. Waste discharge from whiteleg shrimp ponds is typically limited to once per production cycle, moderating the impact of effluents on water quality. There is a lack of data on the quantity of chemical inputs, but evidence suggests that illegal antibiotics are sometimes used on Vietnamese shrimp farms.
General Notes
  • The environmental impacts described are addressed to some degree by certification.
  • The aquaculture industry is currently managed under a farm-based approach

References:

Good Fish Guide - Prawn, King (whiteleg), prawns, Global, GlobalG.A.P.

FishSource - Shrimp, Vietnam